Reasonable Redemption Values (RRVs)

Reasonable Redemption Values (RRVs) are estimates of how much value you can reasonably expect to get from your points.  With almost all points programs, it’s possible to get very little value or, sometimes, huge value from your points.  RRVs are intended to be mid-point values that are reasonably easy to achieve with just a bit of work in finding good rather than poor value awards.

Additional background

With hotel points, we took an easy approach: the RRVs are the median observed values found when users search for hotel awards.  Half of the available awards offered better value and half worse.  You can read more about hotel RRVs and how they were originally determined here.  Airline miles are more complicated since award values vary tremendously based on a huge number of factors.  So, we developed a methodology to simplify things.  You can learn about that here: Airline Miles are worth 1.4 cents each. A simplified approach to Reasonable Redemption Values.

Please also see: Are points worth what they buy or what they save?

Transferable Points

Program Reasonable Redemption Value Source
Amex Membership Rewards 1.55 20% over standard airline mile value (based on the idea that you can transfer points to any of a number of programs in order to find the best award deals) and round to the nearest .05
Chase Ultimate Rewards 1.5 15% over standard airline mile value (based on the idea that you can transfer points to any of a number of programs in order to find the best award deals) and round to the nearest .05
Citi ThankYou Rewards 1.45 10% over standard airline mile value (based on the idea that you can transfer points to any of a number of programs in order to find the best award deals) and round to the nearest .05
Capital One “Miles” 1.45 10% over standard airline mile value (based on the idea that you can transfer points to any of a number of programs in order to find the best award deals) and round to the nearest .05
Brex 1.45 10% over standard airline mile value (based on the idea that you can transfer points to any of a number of programs in order to find the best award deals) and round to the nearest .05

The above RRVs assume that points are transferred to airline miles and used for medium to high value awards. If, instead, you pay with points for travel the redemption value will be lower.

Airline Miles

Program Reasonable Redemption Value Source
Air Canada Aeroplan 1.3 What are airline miles worth? New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.
Alaska MileagePlan 1.3 What are airline miles worth? New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.
American AAdvantage 1.3 What are airline miles worth? New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.
Avianca LifeMiles 1.3 What are airline miles worth? New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.
British Airways Avios 1.09 What are oddball airline miles worth? New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.
Cathay Pacific Asia Mies 1.09 What are oddball airline miles worth? New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.
Delta SkyMiles 1.2 See: What are Delta miles worth?
Frontier Bonus Miles 0.95 What are oddball airline miles worth? New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.
Hawaiian Miles 0.75 What are oddball airline miles worth? New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.
JetBlue TrueBlue 1.33 What are JetBlue TrueBlue points worth? New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.
Korean SkyPass 1.3 What are airline miles worth? New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.
LATAM Pass 0.62 What are oddball airline miles worth? New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.
Miles & More (Lufthansa) 1.3 What are airline miles worth? New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.
Southwest Rapid Rewards 1.4 The new true value of Southwest points, 2018 edition. New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.
United MileagePlus 1.3 What are airline miles worth? New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.
Virgin Atlantic Flying Club 1.3 What are airline miles worth? New: reduced by 7% to account for not earning miles on award flights.

Hotel Points

Program Reasonable Redemption Value Source
Best Western Rewards 0.54 See: What are Best Western points worth? (5/17/21)
Choice Privileges 0.68 See: What are Choice points worth? (5/10/21)
Expedia+ 0.71 3500 points = $25 hotel coupon = .71 cents per point
Hilton Honors 0.40 See: What are Hilton points worth? (5/7/21)
Hyatt 1.60 See: What are Hyatt points worth now, and once they add peak/off-peak pricing? (5/4/21)
IHG Rewards Club 0.60 See our IHG Analysis: Observed mean = 0.58, and observed median = 0.64. (4/9/21)
Marriott Rewards 0.63 See: What are Marriott Bonvoy points worth? (9/28/21)
Radisson Rewards 0.34 See: What are Radisson Hotels Americas points worth? (6/21/21)
Wyndham Rewards 0.82 See: What are Wyndham points worth? (5/12/21)

Other

Program Reasonable Redemption Value Source
Amtrak Guest Rewards 2.56 Points are worth up to 2.56 cents each on Acela trains and up to 2.9 cents each on other routes.
Arrival+ Points 1 Even though there is a 5% rebate when points are redeemed for travel, this estimate is based on the amount of travel that can be bought with existing points regardless of rebates.
CNB Rewards 1.11 When points are used for airfare, the points are more valuable for more expensive flights.  Point values range from 0.9 to 1.16 cents per point. Flights costing $300 offer about 1.11 cents per point value.  See: The Exact Value of CNB Crystal Visa Infinite Points.
FlexPerks 1.5 FlexPerks moved to fixed 1.5 cents per point value as of 1/1/2018
Merrill+ Points 1.44 Assumes using 25,000 points for $360 flight
PenFed Premium Travel Reward 0.85 How much are PenFed points worth?
Uber Cash 0.9 Valuing at 90% of face value since Uber gift cards are often available at a discount.
Most other bank points 1 Most bank point programs have points redeemable for 1 cent each for gift cards or travel.

Update History

  • 6/21/21: Decreased Radisson RRV from 0.38 to 0.34. See: What are Radisson Hotels Americas points worth?
  • 5/18/21: Decreased Marriott RRV from 0.70 to 0.62
  • 5/12/21: Increased Wyndham RRV to 0.82. Decreased Best Western RRV from 0.58 to 0.54.
  • 5/10/21: Decreased Choice RRV from 0.81 (old Hotel Hustle number) to 0.68. See: What are Choice points worth?
  • 5/7/21: Decreased Hilton RRV from 0.45 (old Pointimize number) to 0.4. See this post for details.
  • 5/4/21: Increased Hyatt RRV from 1.5 to 1.6.  See this post for details.
  • 4/19/21: Increased Capital One “Miles” to 1.45 now that they offer 1 to 1 transfers to several programs.
  • 4/9/21: Changed IHG RRV to 0.60.
  • 4/4/21: Changed IHG RRV to 0.50.
  • 6/23/20: With IHG awards now dynamically priced, we determined a new RRV for IHG points (0.65). See this post for details.
  • 10/27/19: CNB point values reduced from 1.25 to 1.11 due to a devaluation.
  • 5/5/2019: Reduced airline RRVs by 7% to account for the lack of earned miles on reward flights. Changed RRV bonuses given to transferable points programs. Capped Hyatt at value of Ultimate Rewards.  Full details can be found here.
  • 11/20/2018: Lowered Amtrak RRV to the Acela rate (1.56)
  • 4/5/2018: Changed Southwest RRV from 1.6 to 1.5 due to devaluation in Wanna Get Away fare awards.
  • 11/14/2017: Updated hotel values based on more recent data. Changed source from Hotel Hustle to Pointimize for many values
  • 3/28/2017: Added CNB Rewards, PenFed Premium Travel Rewards
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[…] Bonvoy program, Marriott Rewards points were worth about 1.4 cents each.  Currently, the guys at Frequent Miler value them at a shade over six-tenths of a cent.  Once Marriott settles on a “conversion rate” going forward, we’ll know exactly what the […]

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[…] two redemptions for a specific airline or hotel are exactly the same, the Frequent Miler blog has estimated cents per point values individuals can reasonably expect to receive from travel redemption… through these […]

Ana

Nick and Greg: I have a question for you. Maybe you can address it on your next podcast. Both of you have recently written articles about sometimes choosing to earn cash back over miles, be it either by using the Bank of America card or the X1 card. I was surprised to read this because, even if a cash back card is used only for non-category spend (ie. the 2.6% BOA card), there are other points cards (like the Amex Blue Business Plus) that would provide a greater value at 2x, based on your reasonable redemption numbers. That makes me feel that, either you are not practicing what you preach, I am missing something, or you have special reasons for your choice of a cash redemption of apparently lower value. I’d love it if you could fill us in. For instance, why choose 3x or 4x on the X1 on dining spend, when the redemption value would be higher (according to your chart) using a points card that gives 2x-4x? Thanks for your comments!

CheerfulCharlie

Where is the love for KLM’s Flying Blue program? Why are they always missing from these lists?

Al C

Interesting to see how you value the points, but something’s not right when Chase is valued at 1.5 and Hyatt is at 1.6…

[…] 先ほどの例を使います。15,000ポイントがHyattポイントなら1.5セント(OMAAT)または1.6セント(FrequentMiler)←どのサイトを参考にするかで変動します。 […]

iheartpoints

Shouldn’t Chase points be set to at least 1.6c/pt given that they are transferrable to Hyatt which is currently 1.6?

Nick Reyes

No. It isn’t surprising that you can get more than one and a half cents in value from some partners (indeed our reasonable redemption values are intentionally conservative and meant to be an expectation of how much you can reasonably get without a large amount of effort to cherry pick the best awards), but a single partner won’t work for everyone. For example, Hyatt has a pretty limited footprint. If they don’t have any hotels where you want to stay, Ultimate Rewards points aren’t worth 1.6 cents based on Hyatt’s valuation. You can reasonably expect to get one and a half cents or more in value from Chase points even if you don’t transfer to Hyatt. If you do transfer to Hyatt, you can reasonably expect to get even more value in the same way that you could reasonably expect to get more value yet if you transfer to Singapore and value a first class redemption on their flights.

Additionally, I think the average card holder is much more likely to redeem points for travel at one and a half cents per point through Chase than to transfer to any partner, so I think it makes sense to have the reasonable floor at that level.

[…] fans.  The annual 7,500 point bonus is almost enough to offset the card’s $75 annual fee (at our Reasonable Redemption Value of 0.82 cents per point, 7,500 points is worth $61.50) and if you stay in Wyndham or Caesar’s properties often enough, […]

[…] 1MR=1.55セントと仮定すると(Frequent Milerのポイント価値を参考にしました) […]

Jags

I think the site has become very pro Capital One lately. I get there’s a lot going on there and all positive, but still…most of their transfer partners are less than 1:1 so why are they getting the same value as TYP?

Randy Sawtelle

Hey @Greg, Any chance the hotel RRV’s can be updated sometime, they are a bit behind..

AAron

The premise that ““Regular” airline miles are those in which 25,000 miles can be redeemed for a US round trip domestic flight. AA, Alaska, Delta, United, and many other airline miles fit this profile.” seems in need of an update since these programs all use variable pricing now except for AS. Do they all need to be downgraded to “oddball mile” 1.09 status?

Also noticed Air France was missing.

Last edited 1 year ago by AAron
Sachin

I think with variable pricing, airlines themselves are providing their estimate or RRVs. Lets say, we sample a large selection of routes for various time frames and compare cash prices to award prices and average them, could it not be reasonable way to estimate RRV?

Lets say, we pick 25 airports across the country, and find cash and award prices for best option between each pair of airports, 1 month away, 2 months away and 3 months away and average the value. If the airline does not offer last seat availability by any means, then we assign a large cost for the case when cash price is available, but award price is not.

This will also solve your problem for transferable currencies. For transferable currencies, while doing the above exercise, you take the best option across all transfer partners, and you have a dynamic way of estimating RRVs. You can alter the number of airports or number of time periods or even take number of stops into account into this algorithm.

Last edited 9 months ago by Sachin

[…] relevant now if you have the Amex Offer for +8 Membership Rewards points per dollar spent. Our Reasonable Redemption Values peg Membership Rewards points at 1.55c per point, meaning that using 1 Membership Rewards point and […]

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Lisa

Would it be possible to regularly update the RRVs, particularly in light of recent devaluations/program changes (United, Marriott, Hyatt, etc)?

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[…] 0.625cpp of value from the points which isn’t terrible, but it’s less than their Reasonable Redemption Value. As Nick pointed out recently, you can get great value from Choice points, particularly in […]

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[…] offer matches the best we’ve ever seen on the consumer version of this card. Based on our Reasonable Redemption Values of 1.82 cents for Membership Rewards, 100K points are worth about $1,820 — though you could […]

[…] offer matches the best we’ve ever seen on the consumer version of this card. Based on our Reasonable Redemption Values of 1.82 cents for Membership Rewards, 100K points are worth about $1,820 — though you could […]

[…] offer matches the best we’ve ever seen on the consumer version of this card. Based on our Reasonable Redemption Values of 1.82 cents for Membership Rewards, 100K points are worth about $1,820 — though you could […]

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[…] as Travel Codex and previously Pointimize provide the best routings for award trips. Sites like Frequent Miler provide point valuations as well. It looks like in addition to monetizing with the $29 annual fee they also use credit card […]

[…] as Travel Codex and previously Pointimize provide the best routings for award trips. Sites like Frequent Miler provide point valuations as well. It looks like in addition to monetizing with the $29 annual fee they also use credit card […]

[…] as Travel Codex and previously Pointimize provide the best routings for award trips. Sites like Frequent Miler provide point valuations as well. It looks like in addition to monetizing with the $29 annual fee they also use credit card […]

[…] to me and might even be enough to convince me to switch a stay to one of these properties. Our Reasonable Redemption Value for Membership Rewards points is 1.82 cents each, making the 5K points offer worth about $91 back […]

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[…] these lines or ships, but if you value Membership Rewards points, this is a very nice return. Our Reasonable Redemption Values pegs Membership Rewards at 1.82 cents each, meaning this offer is worth about $273 – though […]

[…] you value United miles at our Reasonable Redemption Value of 1.4c each (See: Airline Miles are worth 1.4 cents each. A simplified approach to Reasonable […]

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[…] it offers 7,500 points every year at anniversary. According to our Reasonable Redemption Values, that’s worth about $112.50, though it can be worth as much as $143 depending on the […]

[…] a great deal for your Hyatt points as they can often be worth more toward paid stays. In fact, our Reasonable Redemption Values has the median value of Hyatt points at 1.74 cents each when used towards hotel […]

[…] The terms note that it is not valid for e-gift card purchases, though you should be able to buy gift cards in-store. Clearly, the Membership Rewards version of the offer is much stronger if you value Membership Rewards points at anything above $0.01 each (we value them at 1.82 cents each according to our Reasonable Redemption Values). […]

[…] you have a stay planned at a Four Seasons, this is an excellent offer. According to our Reasonable Redemption Values, 15K Membership Rewards points are worth around $273. That said, you could certainly get a lot more […]

[…] in August, the various Marriott and SPG cards will offer 6x on Marriott spend. According to our Reasonable Redemption Values, Marriott points are worth about 0.72 cents each. That makes earnings of 6x comaprable to about a […]

[…] on the Reasonable Redemption Value of 0.38 cpp for Radisson Rewards, that equals a return of 20.9%. It’s possible to get far […]

[…] Cruise. Assuming you value Membership Rewards at more than 1c each (and you should — our Reasonable Redemption Values has them pegged at 1.82c each), the Membership Rewards version of this offer is much stronger […]

[…] of this card, but this is the best we’ve seen on the business version. According to our Reasonable Redemption Values, TrueBlue points are worth around 1.46 cents each, making the signup bonus worth somewhere around […]

[…] to our Reasonable Redemption Values, that’s worth a median value of $3,480. Of course, the suite I showed above at the Park Hyatt […]

[…] on right now), which would translate to 1.67c per United mile. While that’s more than our Reasonable Redemption Value for United miles, it’s certainly possible to get more value than that out of your miles. As […]

[…] though be aware that it takes a large purchase to snag that low rate. That’s higher than our Reasonable Redemption Value for American Airlines miles, though it is certainly possible to redeem miles for greater value with […]

[…] an offer for 2,000 Membership Rewards points rather than $20 (a better deal in my opinion since our Reasonable Redemption Value for MR points puts the points at a significantly higher […]

[…] 10 points per dollar spent on IHG stays (5 at Staybridge Suites & Candlewood Suites). With a Reasonable Redemption Value (RRV) of 0.57cpp (cents per point), that works out at a 5.7% return. If they credited those stays to […]

[…] to our Reasonable Redemption Values, Membership Rewards are worth around 1.82 cents each (though you could certainly get more value […]

[…] Reasonable Redemption Values pegs most airline miles, including American Airlines miles, at 1.4 cents each (For more on why we […]

[…] SPG points. At a value of about 2.19 cents per point, it’s ever so slightly higher than our Reasonable Redemption Value for SPG points (2.16 cents per point) — meaning it’s certainly reasonable, but not […]

[…] them out for $0.01 each, but are much more valuable if transferred to partners strategically. Our Reasonable Redemption Value for Ultimate Rewards points is 1.82 cents each, meaning that you can reasonably expect to redeem […]

[…] snoozer. The 2,000 points per stay (starting with stay #2) are worth about $14.40 according to our Reasonable Redemption Values – and since that only begins with your second stay, your average return per stay drops from […]

[…] 1.5x Hyatt points isn’t a bad rate of return. According to our Reasonable Redemption Values, Hyatt points are worth about 1.74 cents each when used towards Hyatt stays. That makes the return […]

[…] be earning less – just 2 Marriott Rewards points per dollar on unbonused spend. Since our Reasonable Redemption Value for Marriott Rewards points is only 0.72 cents per point, it won’t make sense to put […]

[…] 1pm Eastern time today (Wednesday, April 11th, 2018). That’s actually a bit higher than our Reasonable Redemption Value for IHG points (0.57 cents per point), meaning that you should only get in on this if you have a […]

[…] of those packaes are well below our Reasonable Redemption Value of 0.81 cents for Choice points (based on the Hotel Hustle median observed value in November […]

[…] include free breakfast and some of the Nordic Choice brands also include a free evening meal. Our Reasonable Redemption Value for Choice points is 0.81 cents per point, though it’s often easy to do better in […]

[…] up front, you coudl trigger that Amex Offer for 5,000 Membership Rewards points. According to our Reasonable Redemption Value of 1.82c for Membership Rewards points, that’s worth about another $91. That’s not […]

[…] (10x). This means that $30,000 in spending yields 150,000 Club Carlson points. According to our Reasonable Redemption Values, which are based on the Pointimize Median Observed Values of 11/14/17, Club Carlson / Radisson […]

[…] to our Reasonable Redemption Values, JetBlue TrueBlue points are worth about 1.46 cents each toward airfare. With this transfer bonus, […]

[…] the Membership Rewards offer and value those points beyond 1c each, that’s even better. Our Reasonable Redemption Value for Membership Rewards points is 1.82c each, and you can certainly get more than that with the […]

[…] at least a portion in Membership Rewards points. As you only get a value of 1 cent per point (our Reasonable Redemption Value of Membership Rewards points is 1.82c), it would only make sense to use 1 Membership Rewards point […]

[…] La Quinta stay is potentially a good return, especially for one night stays. Frequent Miler’s Reasonable Redemption Value for Amtrak Guest Rewards points is 2.9 cents per point (cpp), making 1,000 points worth […]

[…] other promotions you’re able to find and stack) is an excellent return. According to our Reasonable Redemption Values, Membership Rewards points are worth about 1.82 cents per point (though you could clearly do much […]

[…] to our Reasonable Redemption Values, JetBlue TrueBlue points are worth about 1.46 cents per point, though this value does vary […]

[…] as good a bonus as we’ve ever seen on the personal Platinum card. Based on our Reasonable Redemption Values, 100K Membership Rewards points are worth somewhere around $1,820 — though you could […]

[…] After applying the VDAY150 coupon code, the total came down $150 to $587.35 — a real-world savings of $137.04 — and note that the trip earns 3,771 TrueBlue points — worth about $55 according to our Reasonable Redemption Values. […]

[…] points per night (or 8,334 Starpoints converted to Marriott at 1:3), that’s well above our Reasonable Redemption Value for Marriott points. If you’re able to book a 5-night stay for 100K Marriott points (33,334 […]

Nick Reyes

Our approach to valuing most airline miles at 1.4 cents is outlined here:

https://frequentmiler.com/2016/12/02/airline-miles-worth-1-4-cents-simplified-approach-reasonable-redemption-values/

Our approach to valuing oddball miles is here:

https://frequentmiler.com/oddball-airline-miles-worth/

In the case of the former (the more “standard” 1.4c-value miles), the point in having a “Reasonable redemption value” is to standardize what you can reasonably expect. You certainly *can* get much more value out of them. The value in having a transferable currency is that you have the power to cherry-pick for a better-than-average redemption by choosing the partner with the best value. Therefore, it’s reasonable to expect that you can do better. Furthermore, if you only hold airline miles in Airline A, but Airline A and its partners do not fly to Airport Y (where you need to go), you’re out of luck. Having a transferable currency gives you the option to transfer to Airline B and take advantage of a different set of partners that do fly to Airport Y — so, again, the flexibility of the points adds value.

In the case of some points, you can also get great value with hotels — like Hyatt (from Ultimate Rewards) and SPG. In the case of SPG, you can often get well over 2 cents per point with SPG hotels, and you also have the ability to transfer to Marriott and get 3 Marriott rewards points for every 1 SPG point. Since Marriott points generally give you .72 cents per point in value, it makes sens to value 1 Starpoint at 3x that valuation.

Does that help give you some clarity?

Omer

If flexible point main strength is transferring them to airlines and if airlines miles (according to your own valuations above) are worth 1.4 to 1.6 then how come you evaluate the various flexible currencies at 1.82??! I wonder…

[…] FrequentMiler and TPG have monthly valuations that tell you what each point are worth. They update them as things changes, as transfer partners are added, as the rules of redemptions are changed etc.  The question is should we abide by these valuations? […]

John Power

I’m a newbie and rather than complain about some perceived esoteric valuation difference, I want to thank you for doing ALL the heavy lifting for guys like me. I had a vague idea what these things were worth but I would never have done the in-depth analysis you have. And come on, folks, it’s FREE to us! I am very grateful to you for all the work you continue to do.
My wife and I do our part by always using Business Saver mileage seats to visit exotic lands – i can’t find a better, more valuable use for our miles.

Jim Lovejoy

Shouldn’t Starwood be valued as if it were a Transferable Point program given all the airlines that it transfers to at 1 Starwood to 1.25 Airline Miles, assuming trasferring in multiples of 20,000? And shouldn’t that make Starwood worth 1.25 as much as UR and MR?

That would also increase the value of Marriot to 1/3 the vale of Starwood.

Credit

Alaska and all the shitty US airlines at the same price.

No comprendo.

[…] get a nice rebate here even if you’re not looking for something from Staples. Based on our Reasonable Redemption Values, 2K Membership Rewards points are worth about $36, making this […]

[…] enough deal. However, I’d prefer 11,500 Membership Rewards points in this spot. Based on our Reasonable Redemption Values, those are worth north of $200 — though you can certainly get more value by putting them […]

[…] to use more points than that as you’re only getting 1 cent per point in value (well below our Reasonable Redemption Value of 1.82 cents per point). Note that this promotion is not for paying with Discover or Citi points […]

[…] isn’t a great deal. According to our Reasonable Redemption Values, Amex Membership Rewards points are worth around 1.82 cents each, yet Hilton Honors points are […]

[…] to our Reasonable Redemption Values, British Airways Avios are only worth about 1.17 cents each. Based on that value and these rates, […]

[…] way, this looks like a good bonus. According to our Reasonable Redemption Values, Club Carlson points are worth about 0.36 cents per point (though you can certainly do better at […]

[…] looking at a cruise with Crystal Cruises, this would be an awesome rebate. According to our Reasonable Redemption Values, 25K Membership Rewards points is worth about $455 — though you can certainly get more value […]

[…] First, Starpoints are significantly more valuable than Hilton points — according to our Reasonable Redemption Values, the 10K total possible bonus is worth about $208, though you can certainly get a lot more value […]

TomT

I’ve read that the Go Far points from Wells Fargo can be redeemed for 1.5 cpp when using their portal to book airfare. However, when I tried it today, it seems that airfare and hotels are charging 1 cpp. I know I can redeem for 1 cpp directly into my Wells Fargo checking or savings account, so I do not see any reason to ever use their travel portal. Might I be doing something wrong?

Credit

You need the visa signature card to redeem it at higher value

[…] points are worth about 0.4 cents per point (under half a cent per point) according to our Reasonable Redemption Values. That makes 10,000 points worth about $40. While that’s not as good as the bonus for adding […]

[…] offer requires hefty spend, but the signup bonus is very valuable. Our Reasonable Redemption Value of 1.82 cents per point pegs the value of the bonus at $2,730. However, you can easily get well […]

[…] cards in my family. It’s worth logging in to see if you are targeted. According to our Reasonable Redemption Values, Membership Rewards points should be worth about 1.82 cents each on average — meaning that 5X […]

[…] annual fee).  Both automatically give you 40,000 points each year when you renew.  At the current Reasonable Redemption Value of .36 cents per point, that works out to $144 of travel value.  I keep the cards because I […]

[…] and income. That said, if you meet the criteria, this could be a pretty good deal. According to our Reasonable Redemption Values, 50,000 TrueBlue points are worth approximately $730. There are apparently regular referral offers […]

Michael Bodaken

I have found that CNB air rewards, secured through the CNB Crystal Visa Infinite card are much less than the advertised airline rewards for the same flights and/or the reasonable cost of the flight. In general, from my home base of Washington DC, flying any real distance to another city, I will use, for example, 67000 or 81,000 points for a roundtrip business class ticket that would cost more than twice that much in dollars and most typically over 100,000 airline points (comparing United and/or American airlines typically). Note: this does not work for foreign flights. ONLY domestic.

[…] or mattress could end up with a nice rebate in terms of Membership Rewards points. According to our Reasonable Redemption Values, Membership Rewards points are worth 1.82 cents a piece, though we know that some people can get 2 […]

[…] current Reasonable Redemption Value for Choice points is .67 cents each, so the ability to buy points for around .45 cents each is […]

[…] current Reasonable Redemption Value for IHG points is .54 cents, so this isn’t really much of a deal. There’s no guarantee […]

Jeremy

Greg,

Shouldn’t Bank Points (AMEX, CITI, CHASE) be worth at maximum the value of the most valuable transfer partner? I understand the ability to transfer to multiple partners some may value more than just transfer to one partner, but I fail to see how you can justify valuing a bank point at something more than the most valuable redemption.

My $0.02

[…] Southwest points = $1,836 Based on our Reasonable Redemption Values, 1 Southwest point is worth about 1.6 cents towards Wanna Get Away fares, but Greg has since […]

[…] SkyMiles are currently offering 15 miles per dollar at eBags. According to Frequent Miler’s Reasonable Redemption Values, at 1.4 cents per mile, Delta SkyMiles are worth a bit more than the Avios.  Buying the above bag, […]

[…] earn 2,400 miles in addition to your normal credit card earnings. Based on Frequent Miler’s Reasonable Redemption Values chart, that is worth about $33.60 — a return of about 9.6%. That is a pretty good return for […]

[…] to Frequent Miler’s Reasonable Redemption Values, JetBlue points are worth about 1.46 cents per point (this does vary a bit; check your preferred […]

[…] point valuations equally tedious and tenuous. Don’t get me wrong — I like having the reasonable redemption values as a benchmark.  I find those values most useful for recognizing when a redemption is clearly […]

[…] rewards card, though, those points can be transferred to many different airlines.  My current reasonable redemption value for Membership Rewards points is 1.82 cents per point.  That means that if you use your points […]

[…] seemed like a way to get great value out of my points.  After all, based on Frequent Miler’s reasonable redemption values, 7500 Marriott points is worth ~$51.  Getting a $210 room for those points seems like a steal. But […]

Mbh

For what it’s worth, I think 30% is just about perfect. To say there should be no increase in valuation due to flexibility is nuts. If I offer you 50000 AA miles or the same # of chase points, the vast majority will choose the latter because it gives them lots of options. Even if you know you want to use them for a trip from A to B, the chase points will let you look at lots of options and choose the one with available seats (or better flight times) before you transfer the points.

Omer

There is something I do not understand – if flexible points can be transferred to airline loyalty programs at a ration of 1:1 and if most airlines points are worth 1.4 cents a point, then how come the flexible point is valued at 1.82 cents a point?

Mser

Makes little sense to value flexible currencies like that. The usual problem (which I think is far and away the most common) I encounter is lack of finding reasonable redemptions due to lack of seat availability. It’s rare as hen’s teeth to consistently find outsized value.

Also, I think it’s more appropriate to use average values from Hotel Hustle, not median values.

CJ

Makes no sense to me to inflate transferable points by 30%. In fact, I will go as far as to say the value of transferable points equals the value of the partner where points will be transferred into and the value of the flexible points cannot exceed the value of its highest transfer partner. Makes no sense to value UR points at 1.82 cpp when 1.70cpp (Hyatt) is based on your calculations the highest possible redemption value. Someone who collects UR points for the sole purpose of booking Southwest flight will always get 1.6cpp value whether they hold points in the form or UR points or Southwest Points. Saying the points are worth 1.82cpp makes no sense at all because it cannot be redeemed at that value.

Frank

The problem is you are talking about two different things: RRV is what you can “reasonably redeem” for — if transfer partners tend to be 1.4 then the flex currency RRV will be 1.4. The “value” of flex currencies will obviously be higher than the fixed currencies but the value of fixed currencies will be below the RRV (if I can redeem for 1.4 then I certainly value them less than 1.4 due to time value, devals, etc.).

tl;dr: flexcurrency RRV should be 1.4, value of any currency is < RRV

Mark

Fairmont points should really be worth 1.0 because they can be redeemed for giftcards (Amazon and other retailers) for 1.0 in 2500 point increments.