Big new 75K offers: Pick 5x office supply or 1.5x everywhere

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Today there are newly increased offers on two of the best business credit cards on the market. After years of only offering 50K bonuses, you can now earn 75,000 Ultimate Rewards points after minimum purchases with a new Chase Ink Business Cash credit card or Chase Ink Business Unlimited credit card. Either bonus is a fantastic deal given the huge value of Ultimate Rewards and excellent earning structure of either card.

The Offers & Key Card Details

For more information and to find application links, click the card names below to go to our dedicated Frequent Miler card pages.

Card Offer and Details
Chase Ink Business Cash Credit Card
75K points
75K after $7.5K spend in 3 months

No Annual Fee

See: How to sign up for Chase Ink cards

Recent better offer: None. This is the best we've seen.

FM Mini Review: This one should be in everyone's wallet. Incredible signup bonus for a no-fee card. Great card for 5X categories. Excellent companion card to Sapphire Reserve, Sapphire Preferred, or Ink Business Preferred.


Card Type: Visa Signature Business

Base
Dine
Gas
Phone
Office
Other

Earning rate: 5X office supplies ⚬ 5X cellular/landline/cable (on up to $25,000 in total purchases in 5x categories annually) ⚬ 2X gas and restaurants ⚬ 5X Lyft

See also: Chase Ultimate Rewards Complete Guide

Card Offer and Details
Chase Ink Business Unlimited
75K points
75K after $7.5K spend in 3 months

No Annual Fee

See: How to sign up for Chase Ink cards

Recent better offer: None. This is the best we've seen.

FM Mini Review: Great signup bonus for a fee-free card. Good option for earning 1.5X everywhere. Good companion card to Ink Business Preferred, Sapphire Reserve or Sapphire Preferred.


Card Type: Visa Signature Business

Base
Other

Earning rate: 1.5X on all purchases ⚬ 5X Lyft

See also: Chase Ultimate Rewards Complete Guide

Quick Thoughts

Both of these cards are excellent ones to have and hold, particularly if you like the Chase Ultimate Rewards ecosystem. While these are marketed as “cash back” cards (and the bonuses are thus advertised as “$750 cash back”), both the initial bonuses and ongoing rewards are earned in the form of Chase Ultimate Rewards points. You’ll need a “premium” or “ultra-premium” Chase card (like the Ink Business Preferred, Sapphire Preferred, or Sapphire Reserve) in order to transfer to partners, but you can easily combine points among your own cards or with one person in your household or co-owner of your business. That means you could also take advantage of being able to use points at a higher value, like 1.5c each via the Chase Sapphire Reserve (either to book travel through the Chase portal or for the awesome Pay Yourself Back feature). That could make the 75K introductory bonus on either of these cards worth as much $1,125 for those with the Sapphire Reserve.

Of course, the points could be even more valuable if leveraged with the right Chase transfer partners. Given that you’d have at least 80,000 points after meeting minimum purchases, you could get to most regions of the world in business class one-way (perhaps even round trip to Europe — maybe even for two or more passengers if we see a promotion like this again and you’re able to combine it with a transfer bonus). To be clear, you likely won’t earn the bonus on one of these cards before that transfer bonus ends, but the point is that these points can have a ton of value in the right circumstances.

And that is before considering that either of these cards are worth having and holding long-term for ongoing spend.

Given that the Chase Ink Cash card offers 5x at office supply stores and on wireless and Internet services (on up to $25K in purchases per year), it has been a long-favored card for places like Staples and Office Max. I’ve also decided to start going after 5x on my cell phone bill rather than opting for a card with credit card insurance.

The Chase Ink Business Unlimited used to be the best Ultimate Rewards card for “everywhere else” spend given that it earns 1.5 points per dollar everywhere. These days, given that the Chase Freedom Unlimited has picked up some additional bonus categories, the Chase Ink Business Unlimited isn’t quite the no-brainer everywhere else card anymore, though at the same time it provides the same excellent return on unbonused spend, so it is still well worth considering (particularly if you have the Freedom Flex, which already has the Freedom Unlimited’s bonus categories)

Both the Chase Ink Cash and Chase Ink Business Unlimited are of course business cards. Chase had really tightened up on business card approvals this spring and summer, but anecdotally at least they seem to be easing up a bit. Historically, these cards have been easier to acquire than the Ink Business Preferred given that they can be approved with lesser credit limits.

Applying for Business Credit Cards: You must have a business to apply, but even a simple sole proprietorship will work. It's likely that you have a business even if you don't realize it.
More:You must have a business (but you probably do): In order to sign up for a business credit card, you must have a business. That said, it's common for people to have businesses without realizing it. If you sell items at a yard sale or on eBay, for example, then you have a business. Similar examples include: consulting, writing (e.g. blog authorship, planning your first novel, etc.), handyman services, owning rental property, renting on airbnb, driving for Uber or Lyft, etc. In any of these cases, your business is considered a Sole Proprietorship unless you form a corporation of some sort.
When you apply for a business credit card as a sole proprietor, you can use your own name as your business name, use your own address and phone as the business' address and phone, and your social security number as the business' Tax ID / EIN. Alternatively, you can get a proper Tax ID / EIN from the IRS for free, in about a minute, through this website.
Is it OK to use business cards for personal expenses? Anecdotally, almost everyone I know uses business cards for personal expenses. That said, the terms in most business card applications state that you should use the card only for business use. Also, some consumer credit card protections do not apply to business cards. My advice: don't use the card for personal expenses if you're not comfortable doing so.

 

Of course, you’ll still need to be under 5/24 in order to be approved. The good news is that Chase business cards don’t add to your 5/24 count, so these won’t push you farther from being able to acquire other Chase cards (though I wouldn’t advise applying for multiple in close succession in the current environment).

Chase's 5/24 Rule: With most Chase credit cards, Chase will not approve your application if you have opened 5 or more cards with any bank in the past 24 months.  This is true for Chase business cards too: you won't be approved if you are over 5/24. That said, if you are under 5/24 and get approved for a Chase business card, that card won't add to your 5/24 count.
To determine your 5/24 status, see: 3 Easy Ways to Count Your 5/24 Status. The easiest option is to track all of your cards for free with Travel Freely.

 

Overall, these cards are well worth it for those qualified: the bonuses and ongoing earning structures are fantastic for cards with no annual fee. In my memory, we’ve never seen an offer this high on either card, so this is probably the time to strike on these if you can.

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